Is Your Technology Integration Rigorous and Relevant Enough? #BCSLearns

I have posted in the past about technology integration and leveraging it powerfully to maximize student learning, and when I came across the article by   and   entitled How to Implement Google Apps with the Rigor Relevance Framework, I thought this may be another resource for us as we work to get the most out of our technology use with students as it relates to their learning.  In the article, the authors as the questions, “Are we using technology in our classroom merely to say we’re using technology in our classroom? Or are we using it to advance learning goals and arm our students with technology skills necessary to thrive in the 21st century? When planning Google Apps for Education lessons, the Rigor/Relevance Framework is the most comprehensive tool educators can use to ensure technology implementation is of real-world, skill-enhancing value to students.” Below is an image for the Rigor Relavance Framework with a description of each quadrant in term of moving up the rigor relevance scale from A to D.

  • Quadrant A — Acquisition:  Student tasks require simple recall and basic understanding of knowledge.
  • Quadrant B — Application:  Students use acquired knowledge to solve problems, design solutions and complete work.
  • Quadrant C — Assimilation:  Students extend and refine acquired knowledge to automatically and routinely analyze information, solve problems and create unique solutions.
  • Quadrant D — Adaptation:  Students think with complexity and apply knowledge and skills to unpredictable situations.

To be sure, each of these quadrants have their place in the learning process, though the point of this framework is to help us understand the learning benefits that students gain from the time spent in each of the quadrants based on the active verbs listed.  That said, quadrants B and C illustrated much higher levels of application and knowledge respectively (than A) while quadrant D illustrates the most rigorous and relevant levels of learning – not the active verbs there and even compare this framework to the SAMR model.

Check out the 9-minute video below of Dr. Willard Daggett (President of the International Center for Leadership and Education) and his take on “teaching 21st century learners.”

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