Spend 10 Minutes Doing Nothing! #BCSLearns

It’s the time of year where we are in the dregs of winter (though it hasn’t always felt that way this winter) and days are short while nights are long – that is not to say that work days are short and nights are full of lengthy sleep.  On the contrary, this is the time of year we all can feel tired and fatigued, if not sick with the flu or the like.  It can be a stressful time of year!  Mindfulness expert, Andy Puddicombe, in the video below, convinces us of the transformative power of doing nothing – (“focused relaxation”).  How to gain greater appreciation and understanding of the present moment!  So, as we head into our mid-winter break from Feb. 22-26, take time, a lot of it, to do NOTHING.  Also take some time to Sharpen the Saw, Stephen Covey’s Habit 7, – I’ve included a short video below where Covey uses the metaphor of a lumberjack who refuses to take time to sharpen his saw because he doesn’t have time.  Enjoy you winter break and remember to take some time doing nothing – Sharpen the Saw and spend some time in “focused relaxation”!

Advertisements

16 thoughts on “Spend 10 Minutes Doing Nothing! #BCSLearns

  1. Scarlet Butzin

    This video talks about the power of silence and what it can do for us when we are stressed on an average day. It is essential to resting our brain and be more mindful in the present moment. We need to know how to approach it too. Meditation is about stepping back and seeing the thought clearly without controlling the mind. We need a balance of focus and relaxation.
    Scarlet Butzin, Morris Wallington, Lynne Parkin and Julie Frishman

    Reply
  2. Amy Burns

    I wish I could stop and take 10 minutes to do nothing. But when I do stop my mind will race with what I need to do next. I need to practice this so that I can be in the moment with my family and my students. Many times I have to have my own children repeat a story or comment because I was thinking of something else instead of giving them my full attention. #stressedoutmom

    Reply
  3. Anne

    One of the key words that stuck out to me was distracted. That we, including our students, have so much going on and in our minds that we are distracted from doing our best work. I know I am often guilty of thinking 5-10 steps ahead of what has to be done instead of being present in the moment. Ten minutes of nothing to me seems like a reset button that we all need to do and even include the students in it. See what changes happen.

    Reply
  4. George

    I personally love TED talks. Having students/ adults take time to focus on the here and now without distractions while being mindful and remain in homeostasis is important.

    Reply
  5. Mandy Harvath

    This topic grabbed me right away because as a working mom, I often have very little time to do ‘nothing’. Those years were glorious… But they have been lost. This video was inspiring and i smiled when I noticed that Scarlet, Amy, and Anne had also watched the video. Clearly….we are moms that are in need of “10 Mindful Minutes”.
    This video spoke to so many truths. Our minds are often in a race. We rarely slow down to enjoy the moments happening around us because we are busy planning for the next moment. It is quite true, and so sad. You cannot help but wonder about the talented and creative minds that are lost in the race. What would happen if we gave ourselves the gift of time?
    This video also reflected upon the role that stress plays in our lives and on our mind. It is very true that the mountains of thoughts we create can lead to a human being that is perpetually “lost in thought”. It is staggering to think that a study found that we are “lost in thought 47% of the time”… The thought of waisting almost half of your life in thought is frightening.
    This video was eye opening, and reminded me that I need to spend more time “in the moment”. Setting a goal to be less distracted and more mindful can lead to a happier life. I am excited to give myself 10 minutes of “focus, calm, and clarity” because my mind clearly deserves it.

    Reply
  6. Amanda Harvath (@MrsHarvath)

    The topic “Spend 10 Minutes Doing Nothing” grabbed me right away because as a working mom, I often have very little time to do ‘nothing’. Those years were glorious… But they have long been lost. This video was inspiring and i smiled when I noticed that Scarlet, Amy, and Anne had also watched the video. Clearly….we are moms that are in need of “10 Mindful Minutes”.
    This video spoke to so many truths. Our minds are often in a race. We rarely slow down to enjoy the moments happening around us because we are busy planning for the next moment. It is quite true, and so sad. You cannot help but wonder about the talented and creative minds that are lost in the race. What would happen if we gave ourselves the gift of time?
    This video also reflected upon the role that stress plays in our lives and on our mind. It is very true that the mountains of thoughts we create can lead to a human being that is perpetually “lost in thought”. It is staggering to think that a study found that we are “lost in thought 47% of the time”… The thought of waisting almost half of your life in thought is frightening.
    This video was eye opening, and reminded me that I need to spend more time “in the moment”. Setting a goal to be less distracted and more mindful can lead to a happier life. I am excited to give myself 10 minutes of “focus, calm, and clarity” because my mind clearly deserves it.

    Reply
    1. Cupcakeasaurus

      Mandy, I really enjoyed your thoughtful response! I really don’t know how all the working parents at this building do it. You are being pulled in so many directions at once, yet you all continue to deliver quality instruction to your students.

      Let me know how your goal to be more mindful goes! I believe in you!

      Reply
  7. Andrea Leach

    This video touched on such an important concept, and one that we all often forget to do in our crazy lives (including our students). I actually caught myself trying to multitask while watching this video about the importance of taking time to have “focused relaxation”! If I couldn’t make it through a 10 minute video without letting my mind wander to the other tasks on my list, it really goes to show the issue at hand is a heavy one. Given how prevalent this is in my own life already, I can’t imagine how much it will continue to be something to keep in mind as I start having my own children (looking at Mandy and Amy’s comments just increase my anxiety about this)! Possibly more importantly, I have to consider the impacts of this phenomenon of constant distraction with my students. If their minds are “lost in thought 47% of the time” I have to consider as a teacher how to combat this and how to help them with that as well.

    Reply
  8. Amanda Husband

    10 minutes sounds amazing and overwhelming at the same time. I’d love to learn more on how to decompress and really learn how to maintain a healthy mind. The world we live in does not unfortunately encourage this but it seems like it should be a priority.

    Reply
  9. Paula Jackson

    I have been practicing and I do mean practicing meditation off and on for some time. Unlike our busy working moms I have come to the point in my life when I have been told I should be slowing down and relaxing more now that I do not have the responsibilities I had when I was younger. If you know me I hear you laughing, slow does not really describe me! However those few minutes I spend doing nothing are a gift I feel we all deserve and must give to ourselves. Letting my mind relax, concentrating on only me, connecting with my soul. It is at this time I can let the frustrations worries and concerns of the day just float away, giving me an opportunity to look at them later in a more relaxed light. Most times I realize the things that are bothering me most are not all that difficult to handle after all.

    Reply
  10. Leslie

    During the winter break I was lucky enough to visit my mom in Florida by myself – just the two of us (my kids had school and my husband had to work so I went by myself!) I had NO responsibility and had chunks of time to sit and relax and do nothing, but stare at the ocean. And I would walk without listening to anything – just walk listening to the ocean, but not voices – incredibly relaxing. I had been having a lot of trouble sleeping prior to that trip, but have been sleeping through the night since I was down there – This is a huge difference and I think it’s because I really had the time to do nothing, make my mind stop racing, and recharge.

    Reply
  11. Pauline

    When I learned about “sharpening the saw” my first question was : Do I have to do all four quadrants every day or can I spread them throughout the week? I couldn’t begin to consider how on earth I could do all four in one day! I realize now that we probably do it unconsciously but the trick is to make it conscious, make it deliberate, be appreciative of what you are doing and take the extra few minutes to reflect on it. Small changes can make this happen. For instance I have always read blog posts and articles but now, instead of racing through them I consciously take the time to digest at least one and respond to it. I have been trying to get my 10,000 steps in every day but rather than just pounding the treadmill I try to get outside and do it, to breathe, enjoy the outside and connect with the environment and the bigger world. Small changes can bring about big rewards and like the air hostess always says, we have to put our own oxygen masks on before we can help others 🙂

    Reply
  12. Tamra

    Prior to this year, I spent most of my time in the car reflecting….detoxing….preparing myself to enter life as a mom when I got home and preparing to complete the work at home I couldn’t get done during the day. My mind races with the best of them and I always am trying to find balance. This year as an “empty nester”, I have been spending more time reflecting and relaxing than ever. For me, prayer has always played a big part of me emptying my mind and helping to reduce my stress. It seems to me that any way we can take time to “smell the roses” or as Pauline said, “put on our own oxygen masks before we can help others”, is going to help no matter how big or small.

    Reply
  13. msdorazio

    To learn that you are “lost in thought 47% of the time” and that the majority of that time is focused on “unhappy thoughts” is shocking. The idea that 10 minutes of doing nothing could give you so much beneficial time back daily is motivating! So, 10 minutes should seem easy right? Last night I gave it a try. It was much harder to completely turn off my mind than I ever imagined. Just as Stephen Covey’s Habit 7 requires “small steps” of sharpening the saw along the way, I decided taking “small steps” to work my way up to 10 minutes over the next week may be the way to go! Creating the routine of stepping back from situations in order to “see them clearly with a relaxed and focused mind” rather than immediately stressing is my goal. I think many of us do eventually look at situations from a different perspective however it isn’t our initial reaction. Gaining a different perspective can be so powerful for not only ourselves but others that are involved in the situation. I loved the idea that incorporating this practice into your daily life allows it to be preventative rather than reactive!

    Reply
  14. Chris Emmi

    As a kid I learned about meditation through various martial arts classes and found it to be amazing. I would practice it often up until I became an adult and found that I didn’t have the time to do it anymore. My life (all of our lives) is so dictated by schedules and immediate needs that the only way I am going to take the time to truly meditate is to actually build it into my schedule. It seems a bit odd and counter intuitive to schedule something for the future to focus on the present, but I think it would be worth the paradox and would allow for me to make a real go of it. As the responsibilities of life increase I feel more and more like I’m functioning on autopilot and am perpetually tired (physically and mentally). I would love to do a midday nap and know it would have huge benefits, but realistically can’t swing it (I wouldn’t be able to stop thinking about things long enough to fall asleep unless I meditated first anyway : ). However taking ten minutes each day to completely remove myself from distraction through meditation is doable, and would give a great return on investment.

    Reply
  15. Bill

    I am a big fan of Steven Covey. I am also a big fan of efficiency…working smarter, not harder. It is a tough lesson to get through to kids, because I think a lot of it is innate. I also really enjoyed the 10 minutes of nothing Ted talk. I can’t rember a time when after carving out 10 minutes to silently ponder a topic, that I have afterwards thought .. what a waste of time. I need to search out more such moments.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s